Investments in Renewable Energy to Double by 2020, Reaching $395 Billion Per Year, Says Bloomberg New Energy Finance

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Stephen Lacey
Climate Progress
November 16th, 2011

The good news: renewable energy investments are projected to double over the next eight years and reach $395 billion per year, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. That’s up from $195 billion in 2010.

The not-so-good news: That still may not be enough to stabilize emissions and control climate change, according to the International Energy Agency.

In 2009, the IEA issued a report concluding that global investments in renewables and efficiency needed to reach roughly $37 trillion by 2030 in order to prevent the worst-case global warming scenario. Even with the strong increases in private and public financing across a range of clean energy technologies, we’re still not at the levels IEA says we need to be.

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GTM Research on the US Solar State of the Union

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Eric Wesoff
Greentech Media
November 16, 2011

Kicking off today's sold-out GTM event on the 67th day A.S. (After Solyndra), Shayle Kann gave a U.S. Solar State of the Union. Here are some highlights:

In case you haven't been paying attention, this has been a very exciting and very difficult year for the U.S. solar industry.

We've had bankruptcies at Solyndra, Evergreen, and Spectrawatt. We've had plant closures at Solon, Solarworld, and UniSolar. The impacts of the Trade Petition from CASM could be profound. The 1603 tax grant program is at risk.

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NRG's Crane Speaks Up for Solar Power

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GetSolar
November 15th, 2011

With the greatest part of American electricity coming from coal and much of the rest coming from natural gas, many in the U.S. have the misperception that electricity companies are all strongly opposed to renewable power. Many cast the issue as pro-business versus pro-environment without realizing that many in the industry are actually some of the biggest supporters of renewable energy.

Yale Environment 360 spoke with David Crane, the chief executive officer of Princeton, New Jersey-based NRG Energy and a major proponent of solar power. NRG owns more than 25 gigawatts of generation capacity, nearly 2.5 percent of the total U.S. capacity, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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The real story of solar and American energy policy

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Rhone Resch
The Daily Caller
November 14th, 2011

The solar energy industry is alive and thriving in the United States. Unfortunately, in recent months sensational headlines and political gamesmanship surrounding the failure of Solyndra have cast a shadow over the good news about the solar industry. There’s also a false notion circulating that the U.S. solar energy industry is the primary beneficiary of energy-related federal subsidies and tax breaks. This is simply not the case.

Readers of The Daily Caller may disagree about federal support for energy producers, but it would be a mistake to say that the comparatively small federal subsidies and tax benefits received by the solar industry are an anomaly. In fact, all forms of domestic energy benefit from long-established policies to foster a strong, consistent supply of energy.

From 19th-century coal through 20th-century oil, natural gas and nuclear energy, energy industries in the United States have received substantial, permanent subsidies from the federal government. It was right to support the launch of those industries to power our economy then; it is right to support solar to power our economy now.

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Solar power has a bright future in Buckeye State

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State Representative Peter Beck
The Columbus Dispatch
November 13th, 2011

A bright spot in Ohio’s economy is the return we get from solar energy. More than 90 companies are manufacturing, installing and distributing solar-energy products in our state, creating 1,000 jobs and helping families regain economic stability and helping Ohio claim its share of this vibrant market.

With the U.S. projected to become the world’s largest solar market in just three years, the solar industry will add tens of thousands of jobs over the coming years, many of them right here in Ohio.

Solar’s growth here mirrors the story across the nation. More than 100,000 Americans work in the U.S. solar industry, double the number of jobs two years ago, according to the Solar Foundation’s jobs census. Solar is one of the fastest growing industries in the entire economy, experiencing 69 percent growth over the past year.

Read more: Solar power has a bright future in Buckeye State

   

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